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Three Indian-origin scientists elected fellows of UK Royal Society




 Three Indian-origin scientists have been elected fellows of the Royal Society, Britain's independent fellowship of many of the world's most eminent scientists, for their "outstanding contributions to science".

      Krishna Chatterjee from Cambridge University, Subhash Khot from New York University and Yadvinder Malhi from Oxford University are among 50 distinguished people from across the world elected as the 2017 cohort of fellows of the academy.

      Royal Society's first Indian-origin president, Nobel Prize-winning scientist Venki Ramakrishnan, welcomed the latest batch into the ranks of the society yesterday.

      "Science is a great triumph of human achievement and has contributed hugely to the prosperity and health of our world. In the coming decades, it will play an increasingly crucial role in tackling the great challenges of our time including food, energy, health and the environment. The new fellows of the Royal Society have already contributed much to science and it gives me great pleasure to welcome them into our ranks," he said in a statement.

      Chatterjee has been recognised for his discoveries of genetic disorders of thyroid gland formation, regulation of hormone synthesis and hormone action, which have advanced the fundamental knowledge of the thyroid axis.

      He has developed and leads Clinical Research Facilities at the University of Cambridge.

      Khot is a theoretical computer scientist who is credited with providing insight into unresolved problems in the field of computational complexity.

      He is best known for his definition of the "Unique Games" problem, and leading the effort to understand its complexity and its pivotal role in the study of efficient approximation of optimisation problems Malhi is an ecosystem ecologist who is credited with advancing the understanding of the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems and how they are responding to the pressures of global change, including climate change, degradation and loss of large animals.

      They join the Fellowship of the Royal Society, which is made up of the most eminent scientists, engineers and technologists from or living and working in the UK and the Commonwealth as well as some foreign members.






Editorial

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